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Professional Staff Congress

Fiscal Year 2002 Budget
Programmatic Priorities

 For The City University
of New York  

click HERE to download this proposal as a Word document  

click HERE for cover letter from PSC First Vice President Steve
London to membership explaining this budget document
and  how we can use it for political action 


CONTENTS
(left click mouse to go to item)

REBUILDING A QUALITY INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF:   new full-time faculty lines | technology assisted instruction | maintenance, repair and upgrading existing facilities | replenish faculty counselors | paid office hours for adjuncts | research awards and professional related travel funds | diversity fund | chancellor's research fellows (junior faculty support) | instructional equipment | digital core and research library

SUPPORTING ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT:  ph.d graduate fellowships | graduate research initiative | seek/cd | honors college (campus-based) | academic support services | writing across the curriculum | freshman year program | collaborative programs with nyc board of education/college now | articulation and transfer | students with disabilities | childcare services | student services | financial aid matching funds |

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT workforce development | centers for worker education

UPGRADING ADMINISTRATIVE SYSTEMS AND INFRASTRUCTURE:  management information systems | facilities maintenance


The Professional Staff Congress/CUNY, the union that represents over 17,000 faculty and professional staff at the City University of New York, offers these budget proposals as a plan to rebuild the University and restore its prominence as a resource for all New Yorkers.  In the last ten years alone, New York State and City contributions to CUNY’s annual budget have declined by $375 million.  A reasonable budget for CUNY would begin by restoring these losses; it would then add the funding needed to make this the great urban university it could be, an institution as characteristic of New York as Central Park or the Metropolitan Museum.  The new leadership of the PSC seeks to initiate a restoration of CUNY’s financial base and a rebuilding of its stature; the proposals presented here are a first step in that process.  They offer a set of realistic goals for this budget cycle.  

The City University of New York is the largest, oldest, and most visible urban university in the United States.  It remains one of the spectacular success stories in the history of higher education.  Nationally, CUNY has been the leader in expanding educational access without compromising academic standards; long before the post-War education boom, CUNY recognized the value of extending higher education to those who had conventionally been excluded because of income, religion, race or gender.  The University’s history has shown the wisdom of that commitment: not only have our graduates contributed in countless ways to public life, but they have worked in partnership with faculty and staff to create new knowledge and expand the frontiers of research.  After a quarter century of disinvestment, the University remains the home of educational innovation and cutting-edge scholarship.  Its faculty and professional staff are among the most productive in the American academic community.   

Yet twenty years of massive economic losses have taken their toll.  The conditions necessary for professional work within a university have been allowed to deteriorate to levels that endanger the fabric of the institution and damage its ability to serve the public. A serious university must offer time for research, it must provide fully staffed libraries and counseling faculties, it must pay all faculty to offer consultation hours with students, it must support the professionals who run its labs and program its computers.  A research university must have a full-time teaching faculty who are supported in the performance of their professional duties of teaching, research, and community service.  

The PSC’s budget proposals recognize that a good education costs money.  Both the state and city are enjoying budget surpluses, and public recognition of the value of higher education has never been more widespread.  New York above all, with a resurgent economy increasingly based on information and technology, should have a premiere urban public university.  The PSC’s budget proposals would recreate CUNY, making it the first-choice institution for New York’s middle class as well as the primary university for the city’s poor and working class. It is in our power together to make CUNY great; we ask our elected representatives to join us in that work.

 

 

 

Budget Highlights... 

The PSC proposes a $1.54 billion budget for CUNY for Fiscal Year 2002.  This is a $164.6 million or 12% increase over last year’s adopted budget.  $140.7 million of this increase is for programmatic initiatives and $23.9 million of the increase is for mandatory expenses.  To fund this budget, the PSC is requesting an increase in New York State funding of  $144.1 million and an increase in New York City funding of $20.5 million.  

 

Rebuilding a Quality Instructional Staff 
Three Year Plan To Reach 70/30% Full-time/Part-time Ratio:
   F/Y 02    F/Y 03    FY 04
   New Liberal Arts and Science Faculty    350   465   465
   New Teacher Education Faculty   108
   New College Laboratory Technicians   120   120   120
   New Higher Education Officers     140   140   140
   New Faculty Counselors       45     45     45
                                                           Totals   763   770    770

Paid Office Hours For Adjuncts

ü          Enhanced PSC Research Awards and Professionally-Related Travel Funds

ü          Junior Faculty Support and Diversity Fund

 

Supporting Academic Achievement

 

Ph.D. Graduate Fellowships

Graduate Research Initiatives

Enhanced SEEK/CD funding

Campus-based Honors College

Building New Technology-Based Classrooms

Modernization of Existing Classrooms

Economic Development 

Centers for Worker Education

Workforce Development

Affordability 

 Tuition Reductions, Especially at the Community Colleges

SEEK/CD Enhancements


Supporting Charts and statistics:

 

 

 

Programmatic Priorities To Rebuild CUNY Into A University Serving The Public’s Interest 


CONTENTS
(left click mouse to go to item)

REBUILDING A QUALITY INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF:   new full-time faculty lines | technology assisted instruction | maintenance, repair and upgrading existing facilities | replenish faculty counselors | paid office hours for adjuncts | research awards and professional related travel funds | diversity fund | chancellor's research fellows (junior faculty support) | instructional equipment | digital core and research library

SUPPORTING ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT:  ph.d graduate fellowships | graduate research initiative | seek/cd | honors college (campus-based) | academic support services | writing across the curriculum | freshman year program | collaborative programs with nyc board of education/college now | articulation and transfer | students with disabilities | childcare services | student services | financial aid matching funds |

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT workforce development | centers for worker education

UPGRADING ADMINISTRATIVE SYSTEMS AND INFRASTRUCTURE:  management information systems | facilities maintenance

 

The following items detail the PSC’s budget priorities for CUNY.   These priorities are stated as programmatic increases over last year’s adopted budget.  While the total budget we propose for CUNY would amount to $1.54 billion, a 12% increase over last year’s adopted budget, we concentrate in this document on the $140.7 million of programmatic increases needed this year to begin CUNY’s revitalization. 

While the PSC shares many budget priorities with CUNY’s Administration (as contained in CUNY’s budget document, 2001-2002 Budget Request), the PSC’s budget requests go beyond CUNY’s in many areas. We indicate in the text and in the summary chart at the end when we are in agreement with CUNY’s budget request.  Realistically, the PSC believes more resources than CUNY requests, in many cases, are necessary to rebuild CUNY and maintain quality. 

For a summary of the PSC’s programmatic increases along with their budgeted allocations, click here.  For an overview of the budget request from New York State and City funding sources for Senior and Community Colleges, click here.  

Rebuilding a Quality Instructional Staff

new full-time faculty lines | technology assisted instruction | maintenance, repair and upgrading existing facilities | replenish faculty counselors | paid office hours for adjuncts | research awards and professional related travel funds | diversity fund | chancellor's research fellows (junior faculty support) | instructional equipment | digital core and research library

New Full-Time Faculty Lines

During the past twenty-five years CUNY has lost nearly half of its full-time faculty lines while the number of students has climbed sharply since the early 1980s.  This reduction in lines has resulted in severe problems in the University and especially in departments where the ratio of part-time to full-time has increased to more than two-to-one.  Since adjunct faculty are hired only to teach, as their number increases in a department, the routine work of a department—curriculum development, classroom observations, departmental administration and committee work—falls to fewer and fewer people. At some point, as the number of adjuncts increases, it becomes impossible to do all the necessary work and the students, the department and the college suffers.  Furthermore, as adjunct faculty are not required or expected to hold office hours, the overall availability of faculty to meet with individual and small groups of students diminishes, further reducing the quality of students' academic experience.  

The decline in full-time faculty threatens the University’s ability to maintain professional degrees that require outside accreditation.  For example, the lack of full-time faculty is such that the University cannot currently meet the New York State Regents’ minimum-mandated requirements for full-time staffing of teacher-education courses.  The PSC did its own survey of seven of CUNY’s teacher-education programs.  The results are as follows: to service current enrollment in these programs, CUNY needs, conservatively, an additional 108 full-time faculty that will cost $8 million.  

Last year, CUNY requested an additional $2 million for teacher education and only got a fraction of that amount.  The Master Plan budget request for this year also projects a $3 million increase.  This is clearly inadequate and must be supplemented.  

The inescapable implication of continuing this general underfunding of CUNY and the specific underfunding of teacher education is that CUNY must reduce student enrollment in teacher-education programs to meet the Regents’ requirements.  Indeed, our survey found that CUNY teacher-education programs are already cutting back student enrollment.  Needless to say, this is not a desirable solution to underfunding with looming shortages of qualified teachers.  

Last year the university proposed restoring 1,500 full-time faculty lines to achieve the University’s Master Plan stated goal of a 70/30 ratio of full-time to part-time faculty.  This five-year effort would require 300 new faculty lines for each of the five years.  Last year fewer than 120 new lines were funded.   In order to make up for last year’s shortfall and deal with pressing needs, we propose that this year’s budget fund 458 new lines (350 liberal-arts and sciences and 108 teacher-education faculty). Over the next two years an additional 465 new faculty each year would put the university back on track to achieve the Master Plan’s goal.  

The cost of this restoration is based on an estimate of annual new full-time faculty costs of $75,000 per year.  Using this estimate, the cost for 458 new faculty lines for this year would be $34.4 million. For each of the next two years the cost would be $34.9 million.

 

  Technology-Assisted Instruction  

Teaching and learning do not occur independent of immediate environment.  While some (and formerly most) classroom teaching required little more than a classroom and chalkboard, instruction today is rapidly becoming technology dependent.  In many fields in which, just a decade ago, it was unthinkable that there would be any use for computers and related technology, instruction increasingly utilizes technology.  All careers today demand familiarity with modern technology.  

Therefore, we are requesting a major investment in technical support for classroom and laboratory/studio instruction.  This investment would include not only equipment and supplies but also technical-support staff, without whom the technology quickly becomes unavailable for instruction.  Additionally, many classrooms and laboratories/studios need substantial infrastructure renovation to make them suitable for installation of computers and computer peripherals.   

We are requesting an upgrading of at least 60 conventional classrooms each year  (approximately three per campus) over three years.  We estimate the cost to be $100,000 per classroom for a total of $6 million per year.  Each upgraded classroom/computer lab requires the presence of a technician for teaching support at an estimated $60,000 per technician for a total of $3.6 million per year.  

Maintenance, Repair and Upgrading Existing Facilities  

Because of years of scarce funds, many CUNY classrooms and teaching laboratories have insufficient equipment, supplies and support staff to provide the best possible learning experience. Resources in these facilities must be at a level with those in research, business and industry in order to provide faculty and students with the prerequisites for competition with other top-ranked institutions.   

We are requesting an upgrading of existing undergraduate laboratories/studios over three years at a cost of $2 million per year and a major effort to modernize and maintain existing facilities at a cost of $3 million per year.  Additionally, we are proposing an increase of 60 academic-support staff at $60,000 each for a total of $3.6 million.  

In Summary

One Year                    Three Years

 

Tech Classrooms                                                       $6,000,000                  $18,000,000

Technical Support Staff                                             $3,600,000                  $10,800,000

Upgrade Existing Labs                                              $5,000,000                  $15,000,000

Technical Support Staff                                             $3,600,000                  $10,800,000

 

Totals                                                                        $18,200,000                  $54,600,000

   

Replenish Non-Teaching Instructional Staff

Over the past decade, there have been several retirement incentives within the University. Additionally, there have been a number of monetary crises at several of the member colleges. This has precipitated a number of retrenchments and fiscal non-reappointments of professional non-teaching instructional-staff members in the Higher Education Officer series. These terminations have led to a 14.9 % decline in staff from 2,176 in June of 1988 to 1,855 this past June. This has occurred even though there have been greater demands placed on these staff members due to increased student needs in admissions, counseling and financial aid. This has resulted in a decline of services and the availability to the students of properly trained staff.

 

June 29, 1988:              Contractually covered HEO employees 2,176

June 7, 1995:                Contractually covered HEO employees 1,915

June 29, 2000:              Contractually covered HEO employees 1,855

 

HEO series staff usually handle the administration of new special programs, such as CLIP. The university has recently embarked on an expanded use of distance learning both centrally and at several of the colleges. Additionally, there has been a dramatic increase in the involvement of the microcomputer and the Internet in the instructional program. These courses and programs all require highly trained staff in the HEO series titles to properly oversee and implement them.

Over the next three years, the university will require the replacement of approximately 300 staff lost over the past decade as a result of continual underfunding. In addition it is estimated that the University will need to create about 120 new lines in order to properly administer and facilitate the computer-related areas. If these lines were phased in over a three-year period, this would require approximately 140 HEO series lines per year, or approximately $8.4 million per year for three years using an average salary and fringe-benefits estimate of $60,000.  

Replenish Faculty Counselors  

CUNY students come from all over the world; many are new immigrants and the first in their families to attend college.  Many more are from low-income families; thousands work full-time.  If the University’s commitment to success for these students is to be real, they must receive the counseling that is often critical to academic survival.  Counseling is a special and acute need at CUNY, especially as the University seeks to improve its retention and graduation rates.  It is imperative that CUNY be able to add faculty counselors, people with the psychological and professional training that enables them to be most effective in an academic setting.  We are requesting an addition of 45 faculty counselors each year for three years.  At an average salary and fringe benefits package of $60,000 each, the annual appropriation would be $2.7 million.  

Paid-Office Hours for Adjuncts

Adjunct faculty are the most exploited workers in the University.  While they carry the bulk of the teaching load (more than half CUNY-wide), adjunct faculty are poorly paid, often have no phone or desk, and are not paid to hold consultation hours with students.  Not only are these conditions unprofessional and demeaning for adjunct faculty, they make for a poor education for the students.  

Often, students’ main contact with the university is through adjunct faculty.  Also, since many adjunct faculty teach introductory and basic-skills courses, they are most students’ initial contact with the University.  A quality education requires that students have access to all faculty outside of class hours where questions can be answered and ideas explored, one-to-one.  It is absolutely essential that we provide to CUNY’s students a full education.  They deserve no less.  

CUNY’s adjunct faculty are well qualified and dedicated.  Many now volunteer their time, when they are able, to their students.  They are professional and responsible.  But, many adjunct faculty have to teach several courses to make ends meet—often at different campuses.  Since they are not paid to have consultations with students, any volunteered time takes away from their ability to work elsewhere.  Paid-office hours will provide adjunct faculty with an additional paid hour each week for each course they teach.  Both students and faculty will benefit from this much-needed reform.  The cost will be $12.8 million.  

Research Awards and Professionally Related Travel Funds

The University currently funds PSC Research Awards and provides money for professionally related travel.  These programs are essential to the research and professional activities of the instructional staff.  The PSC Research Awards sponsor a vast array of research projects and has been extraordinarily successful in promoting research and writing.  We are requesting an additional appropriation of $3 million for the PSC Research Awards.  

Travel funds in the University are very scarce.  The current budget does not allow for scholars to travel to conferences to deliver papers, keep abreast of research, and exchange ideas.  While travel, convention, and hotel costs have skyrocketed, travel monies have remained almost constant.  It is time to invest more funds for professionally related travel.  We request an increase of $2 million.

Diversity Fund

The population of New York City has become increasingly diverse in the last ten years.  Over 40% of the City’s population is now foreign-born.  But CUNY’s staff and professoriate has not kept pace with this change; years of hiring freezes have undermined the University’s ability to diversify its instructional staff.  At senior colleges, entire divisions and many departments have no people of color at all among the full-time teaching ranks.  And the mismatch between student and faculty demographics is growing.    As student diversity surges forward, the community colleges fare somewhat better, yet there is still a noticeable absence of faculty of color and often a glass ceiling for those who are hired.  

The damage inflicted by this staffing pattern is intellectual as well as political.  Some of the most important work in the humanities and social sciences in the last two decades has come as a result of new populations of scholars revising the intellectual terrain of their fields.  Elite private universities recognize this sea-change and are actively recruiting African Americans, Latinos and other underrepresented groups for faculty positions.  Often, the young faculty they recruit are CUNY graduates whose first choice for employment would be to return to CUNY.  

The Diversity Fund would answer this need.  It would provide incentive funds to recruit outstanding faculty and professional staff from underrepresented groups, and would be proportionately distributed among the campuses to address the most acute needs.  The goal would be to raise all campuses at least to CUNY’s median level.  The best-performing colleges, those at the top of the diversity scale, would be encouraged to continue aggressive recruitment of minority faculty and staff even as resources are weighted in favor of CUNY units at the bottom of the scale.  We propose an annual appropriation of $2 million for this purpose.  

 

Chancellor’s Research Fellows (Junior Faculty Support)  

The future of the university is dependent on CUNY’s ability to attract high quality junior faculty.  Facing relatively low salaries, a relatively high workload, and the costly New York rental market, promising new faculty are often dissuaded from accepting a position at CUNY.  In order to recruit the best new faculty, make it possible for them to do their research, and keep them here, CUNY needs to devote resources to reducing the workload of new faculty, to covering moving expenses and the like, and to providing start-up research money—especially in the laboratory-based disciplines where competitive recruitment packages range from $100,000 to $200,000.  We request an appropriation of $7.5 million for this purpose.

Instructional Equipment 

An important aspect of creating a strong academic environment and improving the quality of all academic programs is instructional equipment.  The University must replace obsolete and nonfunctioning equipment and maintain existing equipment.  (See CUNY’s 2001-2002 Budget Request for full details.) We join the University in requesting an appropriation of $1.5 million for this purpose.

Digital Core and Research Library 

CUNY lags far behind its peer institutions in acquiring licensed-electronic resources. The University of Texas at El Paso, for example, currently holds 250 licensed-electronic resources compared to 22 at CUNY.  We also need to restore our libraries’ ability to collect print materials after years of eroding library budgets.  (See CUNY’s 2001-2002 Budget Request for full details.) We join the University in requesting an appropriation of $5 million for this purpose.  

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Supporting Academic Achievement  

ph.d graduate fellowships | graduate research initiative | seek/cd | honors college (campus-based) | academic support services | writing across the curriculum | freshman year program | collaborative programs with nyc board of education/college now | articulation and transfer | students with disabilities | childcare services | student services | financial aid matching funds |

 

Ph.D. Graduate Fellowships

CUNY is almost alone among research universities in not providing tuition remission for graduate students.  Doctoral programs nationwide routinely provide tuition remission for graduate students who serve as adjunct instructors.  CUNY’s inability to offer tuition remission under the current budget severely hampers its ability to attract the best doctoral students; one third of our doctoral programs are ranked in the top twenty nationally, yet we cannot provide even this minimal level of support.  As a result, students coming from top undergraduate programs whose first choice for doctoral study is CUNY often feel compelled to decline an offer of admission.  The loss to the University is great: not only do we lose the chance to educate these leading young scholars, we lose the value they add to the environment we offer to existing faculty.  A primary tool of recruitment and retention for top-level faculty is the quality of graduate students with whom they are able to work: we risk compromising this at CUNY because we do not provide tuition fellowships.  Attracting the best graduate students also means ensuring the best quality Graduate Fellows to aid in undergraduate instruction.  All levels of instruction and research at CUNY suffer because we do not offer tuition remission.  At a minimum, CUNY should provide tuition remission for all of its Ph.D. students who are teaching at least two courses.  The sum of $4 million is proposed for this purpose.  

Graduate Research Initiative  

NSF, NIH, NASA and other governmental agencies do not look favorably on research budgets in which graduate-student support is requested for students who are taking courses full-time and doing little, if any grant research.  This is the reason that nearly every major research university has a pool of fellowship money for graduate students for at least the first year of course work.  Several years ago there was a special graduate research initiative (GRI) for Ph.D. students in the Science, Engineering, and Mathematics disciplines in which $18,000 fellowships were made available for first- and second-year students.  New student enrollment had dropped so sharply that some of the smaller disciplines could not meet the five-student minimum to offer a graduate course.  Initially, these GRI fellowships numbered 100, but this number has dwindled to 55 this past year.  The PSC is requesting that the number of GRI fellowships be increased to 150 and be fully funded for an appropriation of $2.7 million.  

SEEK/CD  

SEEK is the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) for the senior colleges and College Discovery (CD) is the EOP program for the community colleges.  

More than thirty years ago, these programs were created by the state legislature with the particular advocacy of black and Puerto Rican legislators. For the first time, CUNY recognized its obligation to admit in substantial numbers students of color who otherwise would not have had a chance at a college education.  

Over the years SEEK and CD have provided financial and academic support to the most disadvantaged among our students. The programs offer personal and academic counseling, tutorials, workshops, special classes, and summer intervention to insure that the least prepared become as academically able as the best prepared. The graduates of these programs have become exemplary citizens, contributing much to the city and their communities. However, since 1995 the programs have been downsized and their budgets attacked and the impact of the programs is being undermined by the shortfall in funding.   The PSC budget request asks for increases over last year’s budget in order to assert that SEEK and CD are essential to the university and must receive the support they deserve.  Therefore, we request an increase in SEEK funding of $2.7 million and an increase in CD funding of $300,000. 

Honors College (Campus-based)    

Beginning in Fall 2001, the University will inaugurate a new CUNY_wide Honors College. Students for the college will be selected competitively, based on undergraduate records, standardized test scores, recommendations and other criteria. The students will take one Honors College seminar each semester. (See CUNY’s 2001_2002 Budget Request for full details.) We join the University in requesting an appropriation of $1.025 million for this purpose. 

Academic Support Services  

CUNY enrolls an extraordinarily diverse population of students who present special challenges. We need to enhance our ability to provide academic advising, tutoring and supplemental instruction. (See CUNY’s 2001_2002 Budget Request for full details.) We join the University in requesting an increased appropriation of $6 million for this purpose.  

Writing-Across-the-Curriculum       

This writing initiative is linked to a new CUNY Writing Fellows Program that has placed specially trained CUNY doctoral students on undergraduate campuses. The Fellows will be mentored by faculty members while assisting in a variety of capacities in support of intensive writing instruction. The funds will double the number of Fellows from 100 to 200.  (See CUNY’s 2001-2002 Budget Request for full details.) We join the University in requesting an appropriation of $3.5 million for this purpose.  

Freshman Year Programs  

These funds would be used to expand the Coordinated Freshman Year Program and to establish a basic-skills pilot program for English proficient students to complement the Language Immersion Program.  (See CUNY’s 2001-2002 Budget Request for full details.) We join the University in requesting an increased appropriation of $2 million for this purpose.  

Collaborative Programs with the NYC Board of Education/College Now

College Now is a comprehensive collaborative initiative of the City University of New York and the New York City Board of Education. The program is designed to foster the active involvement of every college in the University in the promotion and support of higher standards of academic achievement for all NYC public high school students.  (See CUNY’s 2001-2002 Budget Request for full details.) We join the University in requesting an increased appropriation of $5 million for this purpose.  

Articulation and Transfer  

Approximately 24,000 students a year transfer into the City University’s colleges with advanced standing. The University needs to enhance articulation and transfer support.  (See CUNY’s 2001-2002 Budget Request for full details.) We join the University in requesting an appropriation of $850,000 for this purpose.  

Students with Disabilities

Since 1985, the number of students attending CUNY who have identified themselves as disabled has quadrupled. The University currently supports approximately 7,000 enrolled disabled students, making students with disabilities one of the fastest growing segments of the student population. The University needs to invest in the expansion of assistive technology, training for faculty in the use of accommodations, and the development of more internships and mentoring programs for students with disabilities.  (See CUNY’s 2001-2002 Budget Request for full details.) We join the University in requesting an increased appropriation of $2 million for this purpose.  

Childcare Services  

In 1999-2000, there were 3,212 children enrolled in campus-based childcare at CUNY, while an additional 2,152 children remained on waiting lists. The University needs to expand and improve its childcare services.  (See CUNY’s 2001-2002 Budget Request for full details.) We join the University in requesting an increased appropriation of $750,000 for this purpose.  

Student Services

Many CUNY students hold full-time and part-time jobs. A significant number are also parents. In order to enrich the academic and co-curricular experience for these students, it is important for the University to make improvements in the operation of student-service offices such as registration, financial aid, and career counseling.  (See CUNY’s 2001-2002 Budget Request for full details.) We join the University in requesting an appropriation of $2 million for this purpose.  

Financial-Aid Matching Funds

In order to spend the University’s federal allocation for the Federal Work-Study Program and the Perkins Loan Program, the University must meet the matching fund requirement of one dollar of institutional funds for every three dollars of federal money.  (See CUNY’s 2001-2002 Budget Request for full details.) We join the University in requesting an increased appropriation of $950,000 for this purpose.    

 

Economic Development    

workforce development | centers for worker education

Workforce Development

The City University is the largest single institution engaged in preparing New York City’s resident workforce to meet the requirements of its constantly evolving economy. The University wants to develop a citywide network of employer task forces encompassing all of the key economic sectors of the City’s economy and to continue to develop credit_bearing certificate programs to enable New York residents to acquire or upgrade skills. (See CUNY’s 2001_2002 Budget Request for full details.) We join the University in requesting an increased appropriation of $1.25 million for this purpose.   

Centers for Worker Education  

The City University of New York has several different centers explicitly dedicated to worker education: one at Brooklyn, one at City College, and one at Queens College.  The centers for worker education have grown considerably over the past several years, serving 1,800 unionized working people and their families in New York City.  The overwhelming majority of workers/students are African-American, Latino and female and the centers offer their courses at times convenient for working people.   While the centers offer high quality B.A. and M.A. degrees, their mission has grown to include conferences, union training programs, symposia and continuing education programs.  The academic instruction offered at these centers is supplemented with support services, allowing students to advance their skills and job mobility.  We request the following funding:

 

Centers for Worker Education: Total increased funding $1,231,325.

CCNY CWE       $766,350  
Brooklyn GCWE    $157,900  
Queens Office of WE $307,075  

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Upgrading Administrative Systems and Infrastructure

management information systems | facilities maintenance

Management Information Systems  

The University plans to move forward with a strategy to lay the groundwork for revitalizing its information systems. The current systems are out of date, do not share common technical platforms and data cannot be readily shared among systems.  (See CUNY’s 2001-2002 Budget Request for full details.) We join the University in requesting an increased appropriation of $3 million for this purpose.

Facilities Maintenance  

In order to attract and retain the best students and instructional staff, it is important to provide a safe, inviting, and comfortable environment. It is vital that the campuses carry out routine maintenance functions in all facilities for the health and safety of students and staff.  (See CUNY’s 2001-2002 Budget Request for full details.) We join the University in requesting an increased appropriation of $4 million for this purpose.  

Mandatory Needs are based on CUNY’s estimate as stated in CUNY’s 2001-2002 Budget Request.  

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Professional Staff Congress FY 2002 Budget Programmatic Priorities

 For the City University of New York

 

Program Increases

 

A University Serving the Public’s Interest

 

  Senior            Colleges 

 

Community   Colleges Total               
Rebuilding a Quality Instructional Staff

 

$67,509,999 $29,940,001 $97,450,000
Funding for full_time Faculty (Sr. 234 Faculty; CC 116 Faculty)

 

17,550,00   8,700,000 26,250,000*
Teacher Education (108 Faculty) 8,100,000   8,100,000

 

Technology Assisted Instruction
--60 New Classrooms and 60 CLTs (Sr. 40; CC. 20)

 

6,400,000 3,200,000 9,600,000
Modernize Existing Labs and 60 New CLTs (Sr. 40; CC. 20)

 

5,773,333 2,866,667 8,600,000
Replenish Non_Teaching Instructional Staff (Sr. 93; CC. 47)

 

5,580,000 2,820,000 8,400,000
Replenish Faculty Counselors (Sr. 30; CC; 15)

 

1,800,000 900,000 2,700,000
Paid Office Hours for Adjuncts

 

7,680,000 5,120,000 12,800,000
Research Awards

 

2,000,000 1,000,000 3,000,000
Professionally-related Travel Funds

 

1,333,333 666,6767 2,000,000
Diversity Fund  1,333,333 666,6767 2,000,000

 

Chancellor’s Research Fellows (Junior Faculty Support) 5,500,000 2,000,000 7,500,000
Instructional Equipment

 

1,000,000 500,000 1,500,000

Digital Core and Research

 

3,500,000

1,500,000

5,000,000

Supporting Academic Achievement 22,425,000 $11,350,000 $33,775,00
Ph.D. Graduate Fellowships (tuition waivers)

 

4,000,000   4,000,000
Graduate Research Initiative (150)

 

2,700,000   2,700,000
SEEK/CD

 

2,700,000 300,000 3,000,000
Honors College (Campus-based)

1,025,000

 

 

1,025,000

 

Academic Support Services 4,000,000 2,000,000 6,000,000

 

Writing Across the Curriculum 2,500,000 1,000,000 3,500,000

 

Freshman Year Programs 1,000,000 1,000,000

2,000,000

 

Collaborative Programs w/ NYC Bd of Ed./ College Now

  5,000,000 5,000,000
Articulation and Transfer

 

600,000 250,000 850,000
Students with Disabilities 1,500,000 500,000 2,000,000

 

Child Care

 

500,000 250,000 750,000
Student Services

 

1,250,000 750,000 2,000,000
Financial Aid Matching Funds 650,000 300,000 950,000

 

Economic Development

 

$1,981,325 $500,000 $2,481,325
Workforce Development

 

750,000 500,000 1,250,000
Centers for Worker Education

 

1,231,325   1,231,325
Upgrading Admin. Systems and Infrastructure

 

$5,000,000 $2,000,000 $7,000,000
Management Information Systems

 

2,000,000 1,000,000 3,000,000
Facilities Improvements

 

3,000,000 1,000,000 4,000,000

Total Program Increase

96,916,324 43,790,001 140,706,325

Total Mandatory Needs (Est,)

18,019,000 5,853,000 23,872,000
GRAND TOTAL REQUESTED INCREASE $114,935,324 $49,643,001 $164,578,325

*Items in  blue bold are different from CUNY’s 11/20/2000 Approved Program Increases

TAP adjustments, STAP and Tuition Reduction are budget items also being considered as part of the PSC Legislative Agenda  

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2001-02 Operating Budget Request

Funding Sources

(Adapted from CUNY’s 2001-2002 Budget Request, Page 28)

 

 ($ Millions)

 

 

2000-01

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

Adopted

2001-02

Mandatory

%

Program

%

Requested

%

 

Budget

Request

Changes

Changes

Changes

Change

Change

Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Senior Colleges

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

State Aid

602.9

717.8

18.0

3.0%

96.9

16.1%

114.9

19.1%

City Support*

32.3

32.3

0.0

0.0%

0.0

0.0%

0.0

0.0%

Tuition and Other

383.2

383.2

0.0

0.0%

0.0

0.0%

0.0

0.0%

Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Senior Colleges**

1,018.4

1,133.3

18.0

1.8%

96.9

9.5%

114.9

11.3%

 

Community Colleges

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

State Aid

127.4

156.6

0.0

0.0%

29.2

22.9%

29.2

22.9%

City Support

91.3

111.8

5.9

6.5%

14.6

16.0%

20.5

22.5%

Tuition and Other

137.0

137.0

0.0

0.0%

0.0

0.0%

0.0

0.0%

Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Comm. Colleges

355.7

405.4

5.9

1.7%

43.8

12.3%

49.7

14.0%

 

University-wide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

State Aid

730.3

874.4

18.0

2.5%

126.1

17.3%

144.1

19.7%

City Support

123.6

144.1

5.9

4.8%

14.6

11.8%

20.5

16.6%

Tuition and Other

520.2

520.2

0.0

0.0%

0.0

0.0%

0.0

0.0%

Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total University

1,374.1

1,538.7

23.9

1.7%

140.7

10.2%

164.6

12.0%

 

*   Includes City share of University Management, and Associate Degree programs at Staten Island, John Jay, NYC Technical and Medgar Evers.

 

** Excludes Income Fund Reimbursables and CUTRA.

   

Supporting Charts and statistics:


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PSC/CUNY

Professional Staff Congress-City University of New York

25 West 43rd Street

New York, New York 10036

Phone: 212-354-1252

Fax: 212-302-7815

WWW.PSC-CUNY.ORG

 

Officers

Barbara Bowen, President

Steven London, First Vice President

Cecelia McCall, Secretary

John Hyland, Treasurer

 

University-Wide Officers

Stanley Aronowitz

Blanche Cook

Frank Deale

Susan O’Malley

Sheldon Weinbaum

 

Vice President, Senior Colleges

Michael Fabricant

 

Senior College Officers

Robert Cermele

Peter Ranis

Nancy Romer

 

Vice President, Community Colleges

Anne Friedman

 

Community College Officers

Samuel E. Farrell

Ingrid Hughes

 

Vice President, Cross Campus Units

Peter I. Hoberman

 

Cross Campus Officers

Steven Trimboli

Robbi Weaver

 

Vice President, Part-Time Personnel

Eric Marshall

 

President Emeritus

Irwin H. Polishook

 

Deputy President Emeritus

Israel Kugler

 

Vice President Emeritus, Cross Campus Units

Harold Wilson


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