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The Bountiful Table:

Generous Pay Raises for 80th
Street and College Presidents;
Crumbs for Faculty and Staff

CUNY Chancellor Matthew Goldstein received a $100,000 raise on October 27, when the Board of Trustees voted to raise salaries for administrators covered by the Executive Compensation Plan. The 40% increase, Goldstein’s first since taking office in 1999, brings his total annual pay to $350,000.  

CUNY’s 18 college presidents received raises of 3.2% to 9%; their new salaries range from $167,184 to $221,776. These figures do not include additional compensation such as a housing allowance, use of a CUNY-owned car, etc. Chancellor Goldstein, for example, receives an additional $90,000 for housing costs plus a car and driver, for total compensation that approaches half a million dollars. 

The Board raised pay for executives at the campuses and the Central Office by an average of 5.8%, at a total cost of approximately $2.1 million.

From "80th Street, Presidents Get Generous
Raises." December 2003 Clarion, page 3

 

What’s wrong with CUNY’s executive salary increase? Just about everything. From the way they were approved to the message they send to the people of New York, the raises of up to $100,000 a year for CUNY’s top management are a low point in CUNY’s history. They deliver an insult to the faculty and staff, they signal the entrenchment of “corporate CUNY,” and they laugh in the face of students who pay 25% more in tuition and adjuncts who live on salaries of $20,000.

That management is being rewarded for our work may, finally, be the real injustice. If you look at the “performance goals” on which the presidents’ raises were based, you’ll see a remarkable pattern. Take my own campus, Queens College. Item after item on the list of “college targets” begins like this: “Faculty will....” Faculty will create new programs, win more grants, do more self-studies, form learning communities, increase the use of technology, create a new media lab, and on and on. All worthy objectives, but ones carried out by the faculty and professional staff on top of our existing workload.     

From "Executive Pay Hike -- What's
Wrong With It?" by Barbara Bowen,
December 2003 Clarion, page 11

EVERYTHING YOU EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT CUNY EXECUTIVE PAY  INCREASES